Lumbal_GB

Lumbar puncture with SPROTTE® cannula

The Success Story of Lumbar Puncture

Since its introduction by H.I. Quincke in 1890, lumbar puncture has held a signifi cant position in the fi eld of neurological diagnostics. This is due to the absolute necessity for the extraction of cerebrospinal fl uid and the measurement of cerebrospinal fl uid pressure for differential diagnosis and follow-up monitoring of infections, infl ammatory and tumourous diseases of the nervous system. Myelography, also an absolutely indispensable diagnostic procedure, requires puncture of the spinal dura. It maintains its position as a means of diagnostic investigation, primarily involving conditions where spinal space expansion or compression is concerned, despite the rapid growth and increasing refi nement of imaging methods used in diagnostics.

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Lumbar puncture with SPROTTE® cannula

The Success Story of Lumbar Puncture

Since its introduction by H.I. Quincke in 1890, lumbar puncture has held a signifi cant position in the fi eld of neurological diagnostics. This is due to the absolute necessity for the extraction of cerebrospinal fl uid and the measurement of cerebrospinal fl uid pressure for differential diagnosis and follow-up monitoring of infections, infl ammatory and tumourous diseases of the nervous system. Myelography, also an absolutely indispensable diagnostic procedure, requires puncture of the spinal dura. It maintains its position as a means of diagnostic investigation, primarily involving conditions where spinal space expansion or compression is concerned, despite the rapid growth and increasing refi nement of imaging methods used in diagnostics.

The stature and appreciation which lumbar puncture enjoys from a medical viewpoint is, however, countered by a rather negative image within the general population. This attitude is based on the most feared consequential problems resulting from lumbar puncture:

  • Post-puncture syndrome with severe positionrelated headaches accompanied by nausea and vomiting lasting for up to a week (with a Quincke cannula, incidence of 30-40 %).
  • Low-frequency hearing loss and abducens nerve paresis (rare and mostly reversible)
  • Subdural haematomas (sometimes can appear after a latency period of days/weeks without
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